Category Archives: Community Systems

GOES 12 (GOES South-America) Decommissioning

On August 16, 2013 NOAA will decommission the GOES-12 satellite, as it has exhausted its fuel and reached its operable end of life.  EMWIN, LRIT, and other broadcast services will of course continue on GOES East and GOES West.   Imager data from GOES 12 will no be replaced.

GOES 12 replaced GOES 10 in the GOES South America position.  Both satellites were given a second mission at the end of their primary GOES missions.  As contributions to GEOSS in the Americas, these satellites allowed South American partners to receive more frequent imager data, thereby helping to improve regional operations and products.

GEONETCast Transition from IS9 to IS21 Complete

Intelsat transitioned from IS9 to IS21.   Per earlier notifications GEONETCast Americas users should not notice any change or alteration in the broadcast, nor do users have to change antenna positions.  There was a brief multi-hour data outage, however, the broadcast should have caught up with the backlog.

Photos from the Field: El Salvador Setup of GNC-A Station

IEPAS helped El Salvador’s Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (MARN) install two of five GEONETCast stations, during the week of September 16, 2012.  Stations will be located at field offices and the main operations center in San Salvador.  MARN will use the network to deliver content to field offices, as well as provide redundancy at the main headquarters.

A MARN engineer and technician install a GEONETCast Americas dish on the roof of the Ilopango, El Salvador meteorological office. In the photograph, the dish has just been mounted and the feed horn, with LNB, is being prepared. Photo courtesy of Kelly Sponberg. (c) 2012.

A MARN engineer and technician install a GEONETCast Americas dish on the roof of the Ilopango, El Salvador meteorological office. In the photograph, the dish has just been mounted and the feed horn, with LNB, is being prepared. Photo courtesy of Kelly Sponberg. (c) 2012.

Intelsat Launches IS-21: Implications for GEONETCast Americas

 

IS-9 C-band coverage in the Americas. Image / graphic taken from http://intelsat.com. For current information, please visit the Intelsat website and examine coverage maps and fact sheets.

IS-9 C-band coverage in the Americas. Image / graphic taken from http://intelsat.com. For current information, please visit the Intelsat website and examine coverage maps and fact sheets.

IS-21 C-band coverage in the Americas. Image / graphic taken from http://intelsat.com. For current information, please visit the Intelsat website and examine coverage maps and fact sheets.

IS-21 C-band coverage in the Americas. Image / graphic taken from http://intelsat.com. For current information, please visit the Intelsat website and examine coverage maps and fact sheets.

Intelsat successfully launched IS-21, and it also released a brochure / fact sheet (PDF) on IS-21, which provides some good coverage maps and other information.

IS-21 will shortly replace IS-9.  GNC-A is broadcast on IS-9 over a C-band transponder.  The transition is not expected to affect operations, nor will users need to alter station equipment or re-point dish antenna.  In day-to-day operations, this transition is likely to go unnoticed, and it will likely occur sometime in the 2012 Q4.

IS-21 brings some exciting benefits to GEONETCast Americas.  First, as depicted in the C-band coverage map, the signal strength is better than with IS-9 in existing coverage areas.  In comparison to IS-9, the coverage area of IS-21 also extends somewhat.    For existing ground stations this could mean a better quality signal.  For stations that were planned in the more eastern reaches of the Caribbean or South America, the likelihood of getting a signal lock is improved.

The improved signal strength may allow some GEONETCast Americas users to setup ground stations with 1.8 meter receive dishes, as opposed to the 2.4 meter dishes currently in use.  This may not seem like a huge improvement in dish size, but a 1.8 meter dish is significantly more manageable and easier to deal with logistically than a 2.4 meter dish.